Cocktail Recipes, Spirits, and Local Bars

Not-So Dry Creek (Slideshow)

Not-So Dry Creek (Slideshow)



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West Wines

Like most Dry Creek wineries, West Wines — my first stop — has lots of vines on the valley floor. Owner Bengt Akerlind opened several bottles and gave me the keys to his guest house.

Not-So Dry Creek

A tributary of the Russian River, Dry Creek is now a steady stream because its flow is controlled by Lake Sonoma, carved into the hills of Sonoma’s Coast Range.

Head-Pruned Vines

Dry Creek is well-known for its old-vine zinfandels, many of which are individually head-pruned, standing alone without support from wires or cordons.

Very Traditional

Many of the wineries along Dry Creek have styled their tasting rooms along traditional architectural wines, such as this one for Mill Creek Vineyards, founded in 1974.

Very Modern

Ferrari-Carano has been a Dry Creek fixture since 1981, but its tasting room and winery, almost in the shadow of the Lake Sonoma dam, are a very modern take on a traditional Tuscan estate.

Chambers of Kachina

Dry Creek has a diverse group of winegrowers. Greg and Nancy Chambers left Silicon Valley to start up Kachina Vineyards, and now sell all their production at the winery or by mail order.

The Bench Lands

The Chambers’ home and winery sits on the cooler bench lands above the valley floor. Over a home-cooked dinner, I was treated to Nancy’s chardonnay and Greg’s cabernet and charbono.

Bilbro of Passalacqua

Passalacqua Winery’s Jessica Bilbro was hired two years ago to craft Passalacqua’s elegant, yet big, zinfandels and cabernets. She also poured me a rare fiano white varietal.

Art of the Label

Jason Passalacqua left an electronics career to take over the family business. His modern labels reflect the elegant wines, but one traditional label honors great aunt Edith, herself a winemaker.

Talty Vineyards

Michael Talty boasts he is his winery’s only full-time employee and that he makes only zinfandel wines. “I just wanted to get really good at one thing,” he laughs. He has.

Kreck of Mill Creek

Jeremy Kreck worked in the family vineyards and winery since a teenager, got a degree in business and is now head winemaker. I left loving his sauvignon blanc and cabernet sauvignon.

Higgins of Lambert Bridge

Jennifer Higgins joined her mentor Jill Davis at Lambert Bridge in 2010 and helps make about 20 varietals and blends. We had a great talk over a fabulous wine and food pairing.

Fritz and Kokomo Wineries

Clay Fritz of Fritz Underground Winery and Erik Miller of Kokomo Winery brought their bottles with them for my goodbye dinner at Healdsburg’s Bistro Ralph.

Huevos Rancheros

Visitors can’t leave Healdsburg without a breakfast of huevos rancheros. I savored mine the next morning at Center Street Café before I re-packed my bags for the flight back east.


How To Aerate Flour

I thought I saw a Sifter in front of you & using that is more effective in loosening up and aerating the flour instead of loosening up or ‘aerating’ the flour with a fork or spoon. By using a utensil to loosen the flour may save you a minute or so, it may just catch up to you if it hasn’t been loosened enough or ‘aerated’. Sifting the bread and then using a scale would be more accurate in measuring. Still, sifting the flour and using a measuring cup would still provide you with a more accurate measure. Just sayin’ ….

Jenny clearly states not to sift flour before measuring and yet you came here to override her advice. She is right. You are wrong. And rude. Just sayin’ …

Isn’t this site about baking, not bashing someone else? I am amazed that people have time to be catty over anyone’s remarks. All I want to do is bake.

Can I exchange whole wheat flour for the white .will it be the same amount as the white flour. Will the method be the same.?
Julie

I suggest using one of my recipes that use whole wheat flour that are already tested and proven to work.

I do everything to a T and my loaf never comes out the size it’s supposed too. Always smaller than my Moms and much smaller than the dutch oven. It rises well and tasted fantastic. density is perfect moisture too. just smaller?

Do you use the exact same flour as your mom?

Hi Jenny.
Thank you for this recipe!
I don’t have a thermometer to test the temperatures for either instant or active yeast and was wondering if there was another way to approximate the temperatures?
Thanks in advance,
Loraine

Is the only reason to aerate the flour so you won’t use too much? If you measure by weight does it matter if you aerate it?

My mother, who won contests with her baking 50 years ago, always whisked her flour with a wire whisk before measuring, claiming that it added extra air to the bread (or cake, etc) to make lighter baked goods. So, I whisk, and I weigh everything. She didn’t and she didn’t accurately measure. She just had a feel for how much flour and liquid she needed. The whisking makes a difference.

I agree Diana, some people who daily bake or cook various dishes, including breads, buns etc just develop an eye for such things. My dearly departed mom was a chef for 48 years. From age 5 as her ‘assistant’ to working in her kitchen as a 15 year old apprentice I never once seen her measure, weigh, or hesitate in adding ingredients! I once questioned my mom about this and her reply was simply this: ‘With some people who bake or cook every day they learn how to measure ingredients by look, feel, and by knowing your ingredients.” Mom admitted that she used to measure, or weigh everything until it got to the point that using a scale etc only confirmed what she had already measured by eye. To prove her point she had me pick out 5 various ingredients. I had to measure using a scale while mom measured the same ingredients by eye. I’m 60 now and still have to use a scale etc. Bake on, Diana ! Stay safe.

Jenny – nice instructions and videos. I have some suggestions for you to share with your followers:

there are two basic kinds of yeast – those that should be blended with dry ingredients, and those which should be blended with the water before mixing in the flour – read the label on the yeast jar or packet

don’t use warm tap water – that’s dangerous – should never cook or drink warm tap water as it attracts ionic metals from the pipes in older homes – instead, use cold water and heat it up to 110-120 f

when covering the dough, cover it tightly with the parchment paper then put plastic over the top of the bowl to keep out critters. Hours later, when ready to bake, just remove the plastic and turn over the bowl – the dough will fall onto the parchment paper. Scrape any extra flour from sides of the bowl and put onto the sticky dough. Pick up the parchment paper and drop the dough into the preheated Dutch oven – no need to add flour to the dough so saves time – and you are ready to bake.

When removing from the oven, leave loaf in the hot Dutch oven for around ten minutes as continues to cook, then roll that over to drop the loaf onto a wire rack and remove parchment paper for cooling, otherwise the bread gets soggy

instead of 30 minutes, it is best to wait at least 60-90 minutes (or more) before slicing the bread as it is still cooking inside


How To Aerate Flour

I thought I saw a Sifter in front of you & using that is more effective in loosening up and aerating the flour instead of loosening up or ‘aerating’ the flour with a fork or spoon. By using a utensil to loosen the flour may save you a minute or so, it may just catch up to you if it hasn’t been loosened enough or ‘aerated’. Sifting the bread and then using a scale would be more accurate in measuring. Still, sifting the flour and using a measuring cup would still provide you with a more accurate measure. Just sayin’ ….

Jenny clearly states not to sift flour before measuring and yet you came here to override her advice. She is right. You are wrong. And rude. Just sayin’ …

Isn’t this site about baking, not bashing someone else? I am amazed that people have time to be catty over anyone’s remarks. All I want to do is bake.

Can I exchange whole wheat flour for the white .will it be the same amount as the white flour. Will the method be the same.?
Julie

I suggest using one of my recipes that use whole wheat flour that are already tested and proven to work.

I do everything to a T and my loaf never comes out the size it’s supposed too. Always smaller than my Moms and much smaller than the dutch oven. It rises well and tasted fantastic. density is perfect moisture too. just smaller?

Do you use the exact same flour as your mom?

Hi Jenny.
Thank you for this recipe!
I don’t have a thermometer to test the temperatures for either instant or active yeast and was wondering if there was another way to approximate the temperatures?
Thanks in advance,
Loraine

Is the only reason to aerate the flour so you won’t use too much? If you measure by weight does it matter if you aerate it?

My mother, who won contests with her baking 50 years ago, always whisked her flour with a wire whisk before measuring, claiming that it added extra air to the bread (or cake, etc) to make lighter baked goods. So, I whisk, and I weigh everything. She didn’t and she didn’t accurately measure. She just had a feel for how much flour and liquid she needed. The whisking makes a difference.

I agree Diana, some people who daily bake or cook various dishes, including breads, buns etc just develop an eye for such things. My dearly departed mom was a chef for 48 years. From age 5 as her ‘assistant’ to working in her kitchen as a 15 year old apprentice I never once seen her measure, weigh, or hesitate in adding ingredients! I once questioned my mom about this and her reply was simply this: ‘With some people who bake or cook every day they learn how to measure ingredients by look, feel, and by knowing your ingredients.” Mom admitted that she used to measure, or weigh everything until it got to the point that using a scale etc only confirmed what she had already measured by eye. To prove her point she had me pick out 5 various ingredients. I had to measure using a scale while mom measured the same ingredients by eye. I’m 60 now and still have to use a scale etc. Bake on, Diana ! Stay safe.

Jenny – nice instructions and videos. I have some suggestions for you to share with your followers:

there are two basic kinds of yeast – those that should be blended with dry ingredients, and those which should be blended with the water before mixing in the flour – read the label on the yeast jar or packet

don’t use warm tap water – that’s dangerous – should never cook or drink warm tap water as it attracts ionic metals from the pipes in older homes – instead, use cold water and heat it up to 110-120 f

when covering the dough, cover it tightly with the parchment paper then put plastic over the top of the bowl to keep out critters. Hours later, when ready to bake, just remove the plastic and turn over the bowl – the dough will fall onto the parchment paper. Scrape any extra flour from sides of the bowl and put onto the sticky dough. Pick up the parchment paper and drop the dough into the preheated Dutch oven – no need to add flour to the dough so saves time – and you are ready to bake.

When removing from the oven, leave loaf in the hot Dutch oven for around ten minutes as continues to cook, then roll that over to drop the loaf onto a wire rack and remove parchment paper for cooling, otherwise the bread gets soggy

instead of 30 minutes, it is best to wait at least 60-90 minutes (or more) before slicing the bread as it is still cooking inside


How To Aerate Flour

I thought I saw a Sifter in front of you & using that is more effective in loosening up and aerating the flour instead of loosening up or ‘aerating’ the flour with a fork or spoon. By using a utensil to loosen the flour may save you a minute or so, it may just catch up to you if it hasn’t been loosened enough or ‘aerated’. Sifting the bread and then using a scale would be more accurate in measuring. Still, sifting the flour and using a measuring cup would still provide you with a more accurate measure. Just sayin’ ….

Jenny clearly states not to sift flour before measuring and yet you came here to override her advice. She is right. You are wrong. And rude. Just sayin’ …

Isn’t this site about baking, not bashing someone else? I am amazed that people have time to be catty over anyone’s remarks. All I want to do is bake.

Can I exchange whole wheat flour for the white .will it be the same amount as the white flour. Will the method be the same.?
Julie

I suggest using one of my recipes that use whole wheat flour that are already tested and proven to work.

I do everything to a T and my loaf never comes out the size it’s supposed too. Always smaller than my Moms and much smaller than the dutch oven. It rises well and tasted fantastic. density is perfect moisture too. just smaller?

Do you use the exact same flour as your mom?

Hi Jenny.
Thank you for this recipe!
I don’t have a thermometer to test the temperatures for either instant or active yeast and was wondering if there was another way to approximate the temperatures?
Thanks in advance,
Loraine

Is the only reason to aerate the flour so you won’t use too much? If you measure by weight does it matter if you aerate it?

My mother, who won contests with her baking 50 years ago, always whisked her flour with a wire whisk before measuring, claiming that it added extra air to the bread (or cake, etc) to make lighter baked goods. So, I whisk, and I weigh everything. She didn’t and she didn’t accurately measure. She just had a feel for how much flour and liquid she needed. The whisking makes a difference.

I agree Diana, some people who daily bake or cook various dishes, including breads, buns etc just develop an eye for such things. My dearly departed mom was a chef for 48 years. From age 5 as her ‘assistant’ to working in her kitchen as a 15 year old apprentice I never once seen her measure, weigh, or hesitate in adding ingredients! I once questioned my mom about this and her reply was simply this: ‘With some people who bake or cook every day they learn how to measure ingredients by look, feel, and by knowing your ingredients.” Mom admitted that she used to measure, or weigh everything until it got to the point that using a scale etc only confirmed what she had already measured by eye. To prove her point she had me pick out 5 various ingredients. I had to measure using a scale while mom measured the same ingredients by eye. I’m 60 now and still have to use a scale etc. Bake on, Diana ! Stay safe.

Jenny – nice instructions and videos. I have some suggestions for you to share with your followers:

there are two basic kinds of yeast – those that should be blended with dry ingredients, and those which should be blended with the water before mixing in the flour – read the label on the yeast jar or packet

don’t use warm tap water – that’s dangerous – should never cook or drink warm tap water as it attracts ionic metals from the pipes in older homes – instead, use cold water and heat it up to 110-120 f

when covering the dough, cover it tightly with the parchment paper then put plastic over the top of the bowl to keep out critters. Hours later, when ready to bake, just remove the plastic and turn over the bowl – the dough will fall onto the parchment paper. Scrape any extra flour from sides of the bowl and put onto the sticky dough. Pick up the parchment paper and drop the dough into the preheated Dutch oven – no need to add flour to the dough so saves time – and you are ready to bake.

When removing from the oven, leave loaf in the hot Dutch oven for around ten minutes as continues to cook, then roll that over to drop the loaf onto a wire rack and remove parchment paper for cooling, otherwise the bread gets soggy

instead of 30 minutes, it is best to wait at least 60-90 minutes (or more) before slicing the bread as it is still cooking inside


How To Aerate Flour

I thought I saw a Sifter in front of you & using that is more effective in loosening up and aerating the flour instead of loosening up or ‘aerating’ the flour with a fork or spoon. By using a utensil to loosen the flour may save you a minute or so, it may just catch up to you if it hasn’t been loosened enough or ‘aerated’. Sifting the bread and then using a scale would be more accurate in measuring. Still, sifting the flour and using a measuring cup would still provide you with a more accurate measure. Just sayin’ ….

Jenny clearly states not to sift flour before measuring and yet you came here to override her advice. She is right. You are wrong. And rude. Just sayin’ …

Isn’t this site about baking, not bashing someone else? I am amazed that people have time to be catty over anyone’s remarks. All I want to do is bake.

Can I exchange whole wheat flour for the white .will it be the same amount as the white flour. Will the method be the same.?
Julie

I suggest using one of my recipes that use whole wheat flour that are already tested and proven to work.

I do everything to a T and my loaf never comes out the size it’s supposed too. Always smaller than my Moms and much smaller than the dutch oven. It rises well and tasted fantastic. density is perfect moisture too. just smaller?

Do you use the exact same flour as your mom?

Hi Jenny.
Thank you for this recipe!
I don’t have a thermometer to test the temperatures for either instant or active yeast and was wondering if there was another way to approximate the temperatures?
Thanks in advance,
Loraine

Is the only reason to aerate the flour so you won’t use too much? If you measure by weight does it matter if you aerate it?

My mother, who won contests with her baking 50 years ago, always whisked her flour with a wire whisk before measuring, claiming that it added extra air to the bread (or cake, etc) to make lighter baked goods. So, I whisk, and I weigh everything. She didn’t and she didn’t accurately measure. She just had a feel for how much flour and liquid she needed. The whisking makes a difference.

I agree Diana, some people who daily bake or cook various dishes, including breads, buns etc just develop an eye for such things. My dearly departed mom was a chef for 48 years. From age 5 as her ‘assistant’ to working in her kitchen as a 15 year old apprentice I never once seen her measure, weigh, or hesitate in adding ingredients! I once questioned my mom about this and her reply was simply this: ‘With some people who bake or cook every day they learn how to measure ingredients by look, feel, and by knowing your ingredients.” Mom admitted that she used to measure, or weigh everything until it got to the point that using a scale etc only confirmed what she had already measured by eye. To prove her point she had me pick out 5 various ingredients. I had to measure using a scale while mom measured the same ingredients by eye. I’m 60 now and still have to use a scale etc. Bake on, Diana ! Stay safe.

Jenny – nice instructions and videos. I have some suggestions for you to share with your followers:

there are two basic kinds of yeast – those that should be blended with dry ingredients, and those which should be blended with the water before mixing in the flour – read the label on the yeast jar or packet

don’t use warm tap water – that’s dangerous – should never cook or drink warm tap water as it attracts ionic metals from the pipes in older homes – instead, use cold water and heat it up to 110-120 f

when covering the dough, cover it tightly with the parchment paper then put plastic over the top of the bowl to keep out critters. Hours later, when ready to bake, just remove the plastic and turn over the bowl – the dough will fall onto the parchment paper. Scrape any extra flour from sides of the bowl and put onto the sticky dough. Pick up the parchment paper and drop the dough into the preheated Dutch oven – no need to add flour to the dough so saves time – and you are ready to bake.

When removing from the oven, leave loaf in the hot Dutch oven for around ten minutes as continues to cook, then roll that over to drop the loaf onto a wire rack and remove parchment paper for cooling, otherwise the bread gets soggy

instead of 30 minutes, it is best to wait at least 60-90 minutes (or more) before slicing the bread as it is still cooking inside


How To Aerate Flour

I thought I saw a Sifter in front of you & using that is more effective in loosening up and aerating the flour instead of loosening up or ‘aerating’ the flour with a fork or spoon. By using a utensil to loosen the flour may save you a minute or so, it may just catch up to you if it hasn’t been loosened enough or ‘aerated’. Sifting the bread and then using a scale would be more accurate in measuring. Still, sifting the flour and using a measuring cup would still provide you with a more accurate measure. Just sayin’ ….

Jenny clearly states not to sift flour before measuring and yet you came here to override her advice. She is right. You are wrong. And rude. Just sayin’ …

Isn’t this site about baking, not bashing someone else? I am amazed that people have time to be catty over anyone’s remarks. All I want to do is bake.

Can I exchange whole wheat flour for the white .will it be the same amount as the white flour. Will the method be the same.?
Julie

I suggest using one of my recipes that use whole wheat flour that are already tested and proven to work.

I do everything to a T and my loaf never comes out the size it’s supposed too. Always smaller than my Moms and much smaller than the dutch oven. It rises well and tasted fantastic. density is perfect moisture too. just smaller?

Do you use the exact same flour as your mom?

Hi Jenny.
Thank you for this recipe!
I don’t have a thermometer to test the temperatures for either instant or active yeast and was wondering if there was another way to approximate the temperatures?
Thanks in advance,
Loraine

Is the only reason to aerate the flour so you won’t use too much? If you measure by weight does it matter if you aerate it?

My mother, who won contests with her baking 50 years ago, always whisked her flour with a wire whisk before measuring, claiming that it added extra air to the bread (or cake, etc) to make lighter baked goods. So, I whisk, and I weigh everything. She didn’t and she didn’t accurately measure. She just had a feel for how much flour and liquid she needed. The whisking makes a difference.

I agree Diana, some people who daily bake or cook various dishes, including breads, buns etc just develop an eye for such things. My dearly departed mom was a chef for 48 years. From age 5 as her ‘assistant’ to working in her kitchen as a 15 year old apprentice I never once seen her measure, weigh, or hesitate in adding ingredients! I once questioned my mom about this and her reply was simply this: ‘With some people who bake or cook every day they learn how to measure ingredients by look, feel, and by knowing your ingredients.” Mom admitted that she used to measure, or weigh everything until it got to the point that using a scale etc only confirmed what she had already measured by eye. To prove her point she had me pick out 5 various ingredients. I had to measure using a scale while mom measured the same ingredients by eye. I’m 60 now and still have to use a scale etc. Bake on, Diana ! Stay safe.

Jenny – nice instructions and videos. I have some suggestions for you to share with your followers:

there are two basic kinds of yeast – those that should be blended with dry ingredients, and those which should be blended with the water before mixing in the flour – read the label on the yeast jar or packet

don’t use warm tap water – that’s dangerous – should never cook or drink warm tap water as it attracts ionic metals from the pipes in older homes – instead, use cold water and heat it up to 110-120 f

when covering the dough, cover it tightly with the parchment paper then put plastic over the top of the bowl to keep out critters. Hours later, when ready to bake, just remove the plastic and turn over the bowl – the dough will fall onto the parchment paper. Scrape any extra flour from sides of the bowl and put onto the sticky dough. Pick up the parchment paper and drop the dough into the preheated Dutch oven – no need to add flour to the dough so saves time – and you are ready to bake.

When removing from the oven, leave loaf in the hot Dutch oven for around ten minutes as continues to cook, then roll that over to drop the loaf onto a wire rack and remove parchment paper for cooling, otherwise the bread gets soggy

instead of 30 minutes, it is best to wait at least 60-90 minutes (or more) before slicing the bread as it is still cooking inside


How To Aerate Flour

I thought I saw a Sifter in front of you & using that is more effective in loosening up and aerating the flour instead of loosening up or ‘aerating’ the flour with a fork or spoon. By using a utensil to loosen the flour may save you a minute or so, it may just catch up to you if it hasn’t been loosened enough or ‘aerated’. Sifting the bread and then using a scale would be more accurate in measuring. Still, sifting the flour and using a measuring cup would still provide you with a more accurate measure. Just sayin’ ….

Jenny clearly states not to sift flour before measuring and yet you came here to override her advice. She is right. You are wrong. And rude. Just sayin’ …

Isn’t this site about baking, not bashing someone else? I am amazed that people have time to be catty over anyone’s remarks. All I want to do is bake.

Can I exchange whole wheat flour for the white .will it be the same amount as the white flour. Will the method be the same.?
Julie

I suggest using one of my recipes that use whole wheat flour that are already tested and proven to work.

I do everything to a T and my loaf never comes out the size it’s supposed too. Always smaller than my Moms and much smaller than the dutch oven. It rises well and tasted fantastic. density is perfect moisture too. just smaller?

Do you use the exact same flour as your mom?

Hi Jenny.
Thank you for this recipe!
I don’t have a thermometer to test the temperatures for either instant or active yeast and was wondering if there was another way to approximate the temperatures?
Thanks in advance,
Loraine

Is the only reason to aerate the flour so you won’t use too much? If you measure by weight does it matter if you aerate it?

My mother, who won contests with her baking 50 years ago, always whisked her flour with a wire whisk before measuring, claiming that it added extra air to the bread (or cake, etc) to make lighter baked goods. So, I whisk, and I weigh everything. She didn’t and she didn’t accurately measure. She just had a feel for how much flour and liquid she needed. The whisking makes a difference.

I agree Diana, some people who daily bake or cook various dishes, including breads, buns etc just develop an eye for such things. My dearly departed mom was a chef for 48 years. From age 5 as her ‘assistant’ to working in her kitchen as a 15 year old apprentice I never once seen her measure, weigh, or hesitate in adding ingredients! I once questioned my mom about this and her reply was simply this: ‘With some people who bake or cook every day they learn how to measure ingredients by look, feel, and by knowing your ingredients.” Mom admitted that she used to measure, or weigh everything until it got to the point that using a scale etc only confirmed what she had already measured by eye. To prove her point she had me pick out 5 various ingredients. I had to measure using a scale while mom measured the same ingredients by eye. I’m 60 now and still have to use a scale etc. Bake on, Diana ! Stay safe.

Jenny – nice instructions and videos. I have some suggestions for you to share with your followers:

there are two basic kinds of yeast – those that should be blended with dry ingredients, and those which should be blended with the water before mixing in the flour – read the label on the yeast jar or packet

don’t use warm tap water – that’s dangerous – should never cook or drink warm tap water as it attracts ionic metals from the pipes in older homes – instead, use cold water and heat it up to 110-120 f

when covering the dough, cover it tightly with the parchment paper then put plastic over the top of the bowl to keep out critters. Hours later, when ready to bake, just remove the plastic and turn over the bowl – the dough will fall onto the parchment paper. Scrape any extra flour from sides of the bowl and put onto the sticky dough. Pick up the parchment paper and drop the dough into the preheated Dutch oven – no need to add flour to the dough so saves time – and you are ready to bake.

When removing from the oven, leave loaf in the hot Dutch oven for around ten minutes as continues to cook, then roll that over to drop the loaf onto a wire rack and remove parchment paper for cooling, otherwise the bread gets soggy

instead of 30 minutes, it is best to wait at least 60-90 minutes (or more) before slicing the bread as it is still cooking inside


How To Aerate Flour

I thought I saw a Sifter in front of you & using that is more effective in loosening up and aerating the flour instead of loosening up or ‘aerating’ the flour with a fork or spoon. By using a utensil to loosen the flour may save you a minute or so, it may just catch up to you if it hasn’t been loosened enough or ‘aerated’. Sifting the bread and then using a scale would be more accurate in measuring. Still, sifting the flour and using a measuring cup would still provide you with a more accurate measure. Just sayin’ ….

Jenny clearly states not to sift flour before measuring and yet you came here to override her advice. She is right. You are wrong. And rude. Just sayin’ …

Isn’t this site about baking, not bashing someone else? I am amazed that people have time to be catty over anyone’s remarks. All I want to do is bake.

Can I exchange whole wheat flour for the white .will it be the same amount as the white flour. Will the method be the same.?
Julie

I suggest using one of my recipes that use whole wheat flour that are already tested and proven to work.

I do everything to a T and my loaf never comes out the size it’s supposed too. Always smaller than my Moms and much smaller than the dutch oven. It rises well and tasted fantastic. density is perfect moisture too. just smaller?

Do you use the exact same flour as your mom?

Hi Jenny.
Thank you for this recipe!
I don’t have a thermometer to test the temperatures for either instant or active yeast and was wondering if there was another way to approximate the temperatures?
Thanks in advance,
Loraine

Is the only reason to aerate the flour so you won’t use too much? If you measure by weight does it matter if you aerate it?

My mother, who won contests with her baking 50 years ago, always whisked her flour with a wire whisk before measuring, claiming that it added extra air to the bread (or cake, etc) to make lighter baked goods. So, I whisk, and I weigh everything. She didn’t and she didn’t accurately measure. She just had a feel for how much flour and liquid she needed. The whisking makes a difference.

I agree Diana, some people who daily bake or cook various dishes, including breads, buns etc just develop an eye for such things. My dearly departed mom was a chef for 48 years. From age 5 as her ‘assistant’ to working in her kitchen as a 15 year old apprentice I never once seen her measure, weigh, or hesitate in adding ingredients! I once questioned my mom about this and her reply was simply this: ‘With some people who bake or cook every day they learn how to measure ingredients by look, feel, and by knowing your ingredients.” Mom admitted that she used to measure, or weigh everything until it got to the point that using a scale etc only confirmed what she had already measured by eye. To prove her point she had me pick out 5 various ingredients. I had to measure using a scale while mom measured the same ingredients by eye. I’m 60 now and still have to use a scale etc. Bake on, Diana ! Stay safe.

Jenny – nice instructions and videos. I have some suggestions for you to share with your followers:

there are two basic kinds of yeast – those that should be blended with dry ingredients, and those which should be blended with the water before mixing in the flour – read the label on the yeast jar or packet

don’t use warm tap water – that’s dangerous – should never cook or drink warm tap water as it attracts ionic metals from the pipes in older homes – instead, use cold water and heat it up to 110-120 f

when covering the dough, cover it tightly with the parchment paper then put plastic over the top of the bowl to keep out critters. Hours later, when ready to bake, just remove the plastic and turn over the bowl – the dough will fall onto the parchment paper. Scrape any extra flour from sides of the bowl and put onto the sticky dough. Pick up the parchment paper and drop the dough into the preheated Dutch oven – no need to add flour to the dough so saves time – and you are ready to bake.

When removing from the oven, leave loaf in the hot Dutch oven for around ten minutes as continues to cook, then roll that over to drop the loaf onto a wire rack and remove parchment paper for cooling, otherwise the bread gets soggy

instead of 30 minutes, it is best to wait at least 60-90 minutes (or more) before slicing the bread as it is still cooking inside


How To Aerate Flour

I thought I saw a Sifter in front of you & using that is more effective in loosening up and aerating the flour instead of loosening up or ‘aerating’ the flour with a fork or spoon. By using a utensil to loosen the flour may save you a minute or so, it may just catch up to you if it hasn’t been loosened enough or ‘aerated’. Sifting the bread and then using a scale would be more accurate in measuring. Still, sifting the flour and using a measuring cup would still provide you with a more accurate measure. Just sayin’ ….

Jenny clearly states not to sift flour before measuring and yet you came here to override her advice. She is right. You are wrong. And rude. Just sayin’ …

Isn’t this site about baking, not bashing someone else? I am amazed that people have time to be catty over anyone’s remarks. All I want to do is bake.

Can I exchange whole wheat flour for the white .will it be the same amount as the white flour. Will the method be the same.?
Julie

I suggest using one of my recipes that use whole wheat flour that are already tested and proven to work.

I do everything to a T and my loaf never comes out the size it’s supposed too. Always smaller than my Moms and much smaller than the dutch oven. It rises well and tasted fantastic. density is perfect moisture too. just smaller?

Do you use the exact same flour as your mom?

Hi Jenny.
Thank you for this recipe!
I don’t have a thermometer to test the temperatures for either instant or active yeast and was wondering if there was another way to approximate the temperatures?
Thanks in advance,
Loraine

Is the only reason to aerate the flour so you won’t use too much? If you measure by weight does it matter if you aerate it?

My mother, who won contests with her baking 50 years ago, always whisked her flour with a wire whisk before measuring, claiming that it added extra air to the bread (or cake, etc) to make lighter baked goods. So, I whisk, and I weigh everything. She didn’t and she didn’t accurately measure. She just had a feel for how much flour and liquid she needed. The whisking makes a difference.

I agree Diana, some people who daily bake or cook various dishes, including breads, buns etc just develop an eye for such things. My dearly departed mom was a chef for 48 years. From age 5 as her ‘assistant’ to working in her kitchen as a 15 year old apprentice I never once seen her measure, weigh, or hesitate in adding ingredients! I once questioned my mom about this and her reply was simply this: ‘With some people who bake or cook every day they learn how to measure ingredients by look, feel, and by knowing your ingredients.” Mom admitted that she used to measure, or weigh everything until it got to the point that using a scale etc only confirmed what she had already measured by eye. To prove her point she had me pick out 5 various ingredients. I had to measure using a scale while mom measured the same ingredients by eye. I’m 60 now and still have to use a scale etc. Bake on, Diana ! Stay safe.

Jenny – nice instructions and videos. I have some suggestions for you to share with your followers:

there are two basic kinds of yeast – those that should be blended with dry ingredients, and those which should be blended with the water before mixing in the flour – read the label on the yeast jar or packet

don’t use warm tap water – that’s dangerous – should never cook or drink warm tap water as it attracts ionic metals from the pipes in older homes – instead, use cold water and heat it up to 110-120 f

when covering the dough, cover it tightly with the parchment paper then put plastic over the top of the bowl to keep out critters. Hours later, when ready to bake, just remove the plastic and turn over the bowl – the dough will fall onto the parchment paper. Scrape any extra flour from sides of the bowl and put onto the sticky dough. Pick up the parchment paper and drop the dough into the preheated Dutch oven – no need to add flour to the dough so saves time – and you are ready to bake.

When removing from the oven, leave loaf in the hot Dutch oven for around ten minutes as continues to cook, then roll that over to drop the loaf onto a wire rack and remove parchment paper for cooling, otherwise the bread gets soggy

instead of 30 minutes, it is best to wait at least 60-90 minutes (or more) before slicing the bread as it is still cooking inside


How To Aerate Flour

I thought I saw a Sifter in front of you & using that is more effective in loosening up and aerating the flour instead of loosening up or ‘aerating’ the flour with a fork or spoon. By using a utensil to loosen the flour may save you a minute or so, it may just catch up to you if it hasn’t been loosened enough or ‘aerated’. Sifting the bread and then using a scale would be more accurate in measuring. Still, sifting the flour and using a measuring cup would still provide you with a more accurate measure. Just sayin’ ….

Jenny clearly states not to sift flour before measuring and yet you came here to override her advice. She is right. You are wrong. And rude. Just sayin’ …

Isn’t this site about baking, not bashing someone else? I am amazed that people have time to be catty over anyone’s remarks. All I want to do is bake.

Can I exchange whole wheat flour for the white .will it be the same amount as the white flour. Will the method be the same.?
Julie

I suggest using one of my recipes that use whole wheat flour that are already tested and proven to work.

I do everything to a T and my loaf never comes out the size it’s supposed too. Always smaller than my Moms and much smaller than the dutch oven. It rises well and tasted fantastic. density is perfect moisture too. just smaller?

Do you use the exact same flour as your mom?

Hi Jenny.
Thank you for this recipe!
I don’t have a thermometer to test the temperatures for either instant or active yeast and was wondering if there was another way to approximate the temperatures?
Thanks in advance,
Loraine

Is the only reason to aerate the flour so you won’t use too much? If you measure by weight does it matter if you aerate it?

My mother, who won contests with her baking 50 years ago, always whisked her flour with a wire whisk before measuring, claiming that it added extra air to the bread (or cake, etc) to make lighter baked goods. So, I whisk, and I weigh everything. She didn’t and she didn’t accurately measure. She just had a feel for how much flour and liquid she needed. The whisking makes a difference.

I agree Diana, some people who daily bake or cook various dishes, including breads, buns etc just develop an eye for such things. My dearly departed mom was a chef for 48 years. From age 5 as her ‘assistant’ to working in her kitchen as a 15 year old apprentice I never once seen her measure, weigh, or hesitate in adding ingredients! I once questioned my mom about this and her reply was simply this: ‘With some people who bake or cook every day they learn how to measure ingredients by look, feel, and by knowing your ingredients.” Mom admitted that she used to measure, or weigh everything until it got to the point that using a scale etc only confirmed what she had already measured by eye. To prove her point she had me pick out 5 various ingredients. I had to measure using a scale while mom measured the same ingredients by eye. I’m 60 now and still have to use a scale etc. Bake on, Diana ! Stay safe.

Jenny – nice instructions and videos. I have some suggestions for you to share with your followers:

there are two basic kinds of yeast – those that should be blended with dry ingredients, and those which should be blended with the water before mixing in the flour – read the label on the yeast jar or packet

don’t use warm tap water – that’s dangerous – should never cook or drink warm tap water as it attracts ionic metals from the pipes in older homes – instead, use cold water and heat it up to 110-120 f

when covering the dough, cover it tightly with the parchment paper then put plastic over the top of the bowl to keep out critters. Hours later, when ready to bake, just remove the plastic and turn over the bowl – the dough will fall onto the parchment paper. Scrape any extra flour from sides of the bowl and put onto the sticky dough. Pick up the parchment paper and drop the dough into the preheated Dutch oven – no need to add flour to the dough so saves time – and you are ready to bake.

When removing from the oven, leave loaf in the hot Dutch oven for around ten minutes as continues to cook, then roll that over to drop the loaf onto a wire rack and remove parchment paper for cooling, otherwise the bread gets soggy

instead of 30 minutes, it is best to wait at least 60-90 minutes (or more) before slicing the bread as it is still cooking inside


How To Aerate Flour

I thought I saw a Sifter in front of you & using that is more effective in loosening up and aerating the flour instead of loosening up or ‘aerating’ the flour with a fork or spoon. By using a utensil to loosen the flour may save you a minute or so, it may just catch up to you if it hasn’t been loosened enough or ‘aerated’. Sifting the bread and then using a scale would be more accurate in measuring. Still, sifting the flour and using a measuring cup would still provide you with a more accurate measure. Just sayin’ ….

Jenny clearly states not to sift flour before measuring and yet you came here to override her advice. She is right. You are wrong. And rude. Just sayin’ …

Isn’t this site about baking, not bashing someone else? I am amazed that people have time to be catty over anyone’s remarks. All I want to do is bake.

Can I exchange whole wheat flour for the white .will it be the same amount as the white flour. Will the method be the same.?
Julie

I suggest using one of my recipes that use whole wheat flour that are already tested and proven to work.

I do everything to a T and my loaf never comes out the size it’s supposed too. Always smaller than my Moms and much smaller than the dutch oven. It rises well and tasted fantastic. density is perfect moisture too. just smaller?

Do you use the exact same flour as your mom?

Hi Jenny.
Thank you for this recipe!
I don’t have a thermometer to test the temperatures for either instant or active yeast and was wondering if there was another way to approximate the temperatures?
Thanks in advance,
Loraine

Is the only reason to aerate the flour so you won’t use too much? If you measure by weight does it matter if you aerate it?

My mother, who won contests with her baking 50 years ago, always whisked her flour with a wire whisk before measuring, claiming that it added extra air to the bread (or cake, etc) to make lighter baked goods. So, I whisk, and I weigh everything. She didn’t and she didn’t accurately measure. She just had a feel for how much flour and liquid she needed. The whisking makes a difference.

I agree Diana, some people who daily bake or cook various dishes, including breads, buns etc just develop an eye for such things. My dearly departed mom was a chef for 48 years. From age 5 as her ‘assistant’ to working in her kitchen as a 15 year old apprentice I never once seen her measure, weigh, or hesitate in adding ingredients! I once questioned my mom about this and her reply was simply this: ‘With some people who bake or cook every day they learn how to measure ingredients by look, feel, and by knowing your ingredients.” Mom admitted that she used to measure, or weigh everything until it got to the point that using a scale etc only confirmed what she had already measured by eye. To prove her point she had me pick out 5 various ingredients. I had to measure using a scale while mom measured the same ingredients by eye. I’m 60 now and still have to use a scale etc. Bake on, Diana ! Stay safe.

Jenny – nice instructions and videos. I have some suggestions for you to share with your followers:

there are two basic kinds of yeast – those that should be blended with dry ingredients, and those which should be blended with the water before mixing in the flour – read the label on the yeast jar or packet

don’t use warm tap water – that’s dangerous – should never cook or drink warm tap water as it attracts ionic metals from the pipes in older homes – instead, use cold water and heat it up to 110-120 f

when covering the dough, cover it tightly with the parchment paper then put plastic over the top of the bowl to keep out critters. Hours later, when ready to bake, just remove the plastic and turn over the bowl – the dough will fall onto the parchment paper. Scrape any extra flour from sides of the bowl and put onto the sticky dough. Pick up the parchment paper and drop the dough into the preheated Dutch oven – no need to add flour to the dough so saves time – and you are ready to bake.

When removing from the oven, leave loaf in the hot Dutch oven for around ten minutes as continues to cook, then roll that over to drop the loaf onto a wire rack and remove parchment paper for cooling, otherwise the bread gets soggy

instead of 30 minutes, it is best to wait at least 60-90 minutes (or more) before slicing the bread as it is still cooking inside


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