Cocktail Recipes, Spirits, and Local Bars

Why You Should Go to a Bar Alone on Valentine's Day

Why You Should Go to a Bar Alone on Valentine's Day



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... and how to pick the right one

So, you’re single on Valentine’s Day. You could spend the night at home, drowning in a sea of Netflix and boxed wine. Or, you could pick yourself up by the bootstraps, venture out to a bar, and interact with other human beings. But what kind of bar should you choose?

If you want to…

… drown your sorrows in cheap beer and relieve a little pent-up frustration through a high-stakes game of pool or darts, head to a dive bar. Be sure to bring enough quarters to own that jukebox, and, if you’re really feeling generous, buy all the other poor saps around you a shot. They need it as much as you do.

… convince yourself that you don’t need a romantic partner in order to lead a sexy, sophisticated lifestyle, then head to the swankiest cocktail bar you can find, preferably one with a ton of Bols genever and St-Germain on the menu. Order the fruitiest cocktails you can find (who’s there to judge you?), swivel the drink in your hand, lean back, and peruse the rest of the crowd. Have your last cocktail, and then decide on one more. If your bartender is cute, write your number on the receipt, or ask for theirs. Happy Valentine’s Day to you.

… get drunk with all your friends and not think about romance once, find the nearest tiki bar. Order a Scorpion Bowl — better yet, order two. Yeah, you look a little bit fratty sucking down a sugary rum drink out of a communal bowl, but dammit, you’re going to have fun on Valentine’s Day! And you’re not going to remember any of it, tomorrow.


How to Not Embarrass Yourself at a Winery

There is an unspoken code of conduct that comes into play when visiting a winery. After all, some wineries see hundreds of visitors a day, while others𠅎xclusive appointment-only wineries—may entertain as few as 10 guests daily. But no matter the size of the crowd, passing out on the welcome couch and drooling all over some custom-designed pillows because you drank too much isn’t going to fly. Making matters worse, all anyone can smell is the powerful cologne you doused yourself with, which is now saturating the pillow, too.

So, it’s time for the talk. Not that one—I mean, how not to embarrass yourself at a winery.

It’s easy to get caught up in the romance of visiting wine country𠅊nd even easier to land a quick buzz by drinking everything offered to you. But things can get sloppy fast. And, hey, we’ve all been there.

I remember my first wine tasting in Napa Valley. My then-fiance and soon-to-be mother-in-law dropped by Heitz Cellars in St. Helena, California, which in the early aughts offered free tastings. I recall being timid and unsure of the protocol, so I drank everything: two-ounce pours of maybe ten different wines in about 20 minutes’ time. By the end, my knees were buckling, I was quoting Frank Sinatra (“Nobody was driving, officer, we were all in the back seat!”) and trying to convince the host I was looking to buy Heitz—much to the dismay of my future mother-in-law and wife.

Take it from me, here’s a bit of gathered advice and some common faux pas to avoid:


How to Not Embarrass Yourself at a Winery

There is an unspoken code of conduct that comes into play when visiting a winery. After all, some wineries see hundreds of visitors a day, while others𠅎xclusive appointment-only wineries—may entertain as few as 10 guests daily. But no matter the size of the crowd, passing out on the welcome couch and drooling all over some custom-designed pillows because you drank too much isn’t going to fly. Making matters worse, all anyone can smell is the powerful cologne you doused yourself with, which is now saturating the pillow, too.

So, it’s time for the talk. Not that one—I mean, how not to embarrass yourself at a winery.

It’s easy to get caught up in the romance of visiting wine country𠅊nd even easier to land a quick buzz by drinking everything offered to you. But things can get sloppy fast. And, hey, we’ve all been there.

I remember my first wine tasting in Napa Valley. My then-fiance and soon-to-be mother-in-law dropped by Heitz Cellars in St. Helena, California, which in the early aughts offered free tastings. I recall being timid and unsure of the protocol, so I drank everything: two-ounce pours of maybe ten different wines in about 20 minutes’ time. By the end, my knees were buckling, I was quoting Frank Sinatra (“Nobody was driving, officer, we were all in the back seat!”) and trying to convince the host I was looking to buy Heitz—much to the dismay of my future mother-in-law and wife.

Take it from me, here’s a bit of gathered advice and some common faux pas to avoid:


How to Not Embarrass Yourself at a Winery

There is an unspoken code of conduct that comes into play when visiting a winery. After all, some wineries see hundreds of visitors a day, while others𠅎xclusive appointment-only wineries—may entertain as few as 10 guests daily. But no matter the size of the crowd, passing out on the welcome couch and drooling all over some custom-designed pillows because you drank too much isn’t going to fly. Making matters worse, all anyone can smell is the powerful cologne you doused yourself with, which is now saturating the pillow, too.

So, it’s time for the talk. Not that one—I mean, how not to embarrass yourself at a winery.

It’s easy to get caught up in the romance of visiting wine country𠅊nd even easier to land a quick buzz by drinking everything offered to you. But things can get sloppy fast. And, hey, we’ve all been there.

I remember my first wine tasting in Napa Valley. My then-fiance and soon-to-be mother-in-law dropped by Heitz Cellars in St. Helena, California, which in the early aughts offered free tastings. I recall being timid and unsure of the protocol, so I drank everything: two-ounce pours of maybe ten different wines in about 20 minutes’ time. By the end, my knees were buckling, I was quoting Frank Sinatra (“Nobody was driving, officer, we were all in the back seat!”) and trying to convince the host I was looking to buy Heitz—much to the dismay of my future mother-in-law and wife.

Take it from me, here’s a bit of gathered advice and some common faux pas to avoid:


How to Not Embarrass Yourself at a Winery

There is an unspoken code of conduct that comes into play when visiting a winery. After all, some wineries see hundreds of visitors a day, while others𠅎xclusive appointment-only wineries—may entertain as few as 10 guests daily. But no matter the size of the crowd, passing out on the welcome couch and drooling all over some custom-designed pillows because you drank too much isn’t going to fly. Making matters worse, all anyone can smell is the powerful cologne you doused yourself with, which is now saturating the pillow, too.

So, it’s time for the talk. Not that one—I mean, how not to embarrass yourself at a winery.

It’s easy to get caught up in the romance of visiting wine country𠅊nd even easier to land a quick buzz by drinking everything offered to you. But things can get sloppy fast. And, hey, we’ve all been there.

I remember my first wine tasting in Napa Valley. My then-fiance and soon-to-be mother-in-law dropped by Heitz Cellars in St. Helena, California, which in the early aughts offered free tastings. I recall being timid and unsure of the protocol, so I drank everything: two-ounce pours of maybe ten different wines in about 20 minutes’ time. By the end, my knees were buckling, I was quoting Frank Sinatra (“Nobody was driving, officer, we were all in the back seat!”) and trying to convince the host I was looking to buy Heitz—much to the dismay of my future mother-in-law and wife.

Take it from me, here’s a bit of gathered advice and some common faux pas to avoid:


How to Not Embarrass Yourself at a Winery

There is an unspoken code of conduct that comes into play when visiting a winery. After all, some wineries see hundreds of visitors a day, while others𠅎xclusive appointment-only wineries—may entertain as few as 10 guests daily. But no matter the size of the crowd, passing out on the welcome couch and drooling all over some custom-designed pillows because you drank too much isn’t going to fly. Making matters worse, all anyone can smell is the powerful cologne you doused yourself with, which is now saturating the pillow, too.

So, it’s time for the talk. Not that one—I mean, how not to embarrass yourself at a winery.

It’s easy to get caught up in the romance of visiting wine country𠅊nd even easier to land a quick buzz by drinking everything offered to you. But things can get sloppy fast. And, hey, we’ve all been there.

I remember my first wine tasting in Napa Valley. My then-fiance and soon-to-be mother-in-law dropped by Heitz Cellars in St. Helena, California, which in the early aughts offered free tastings. I recall being timid and unsure of the protocol, so I drank everything: two-ounce pours of maybe ten different wines in about 20 minutes’ time. By the end, my knees were buckling, I was quoting Frank Sinatra (“Nobody was driving, officer, we were all in the back seat!”) and trying to convince the host I was looking to buy Heitz—much to the dismay of my future mother-in-law and wife.

Take it from me, here’s a bit of gathered advice and some common faux pas to avoid:


How to Not Embarrass Yourself at a Winery

There is an unspoken code of conduct that comes into play when visiting a winery. After all, some wineries see hundreds of visitors a day, while others𠅎xclusive appointment-only wineries—may entertain as few as 10 guests daily. But no matter the size of the crowd, passing out on the welcome couch and drooling all over some custom-designed pillows because you drank too much isn’t going to fly. Making matters worse, all anyone can smell is the powerful cologne you doused yourself with, which is now saturating the pillow, too.

So, it’s time for the talk. Not that one—I mean, how not to embarrass yourself at a winery.

It’s easy to get caught up in the romance of visiting wine country𠅊nd even easier to land a quick buzz by drinking everything offered to you. But things can get sloppy fast. And, hey, we’ve all been there.

I remember my first wine tasting in Napa Valley. My then-fiance and soon-to-be mother-in-law dropped by Heitz Cellars in St. Helena, California, which in the early aughts offered free tastings. I recall being timid and unsure of the protocol, so I drank everything: two-ounce pours of maybe ten different wines in about 20 minutes’ time. By the end, my knees were buckling, I was quoting Frank Sinatra (“Nobody was driving, officer, we were all in the back seat!”) and trying to convince the host I was looking to buy Heitz—much to the dismay of my future mother-in-law and wife.

Take it from me, here’s a bit of gathered advice and some common faux pas to avoid:


How to Not Embarrass Yourself at a Winery

There is an unspoken code of conduct that comes into play when visiting a winery. After all, some wineries see hundreds of visitors a day, while others𠅎xclusive appointment-only wineries—may entertain as few as 10 guests daily. But no matter the size of the crowd, passing out on the welcome couch and drooling all over some custom-designed pillows because you drank too much isn’t going to fly. Making matters worse, all anyone can smell is the powerful cologne you doused yourself with, which is now saturating the pillow, too.

So, it’s time for the talk. Not that one—I mean, how not to embarrass yourself at a winery.

It’s easy to get caught up in the romance of visiting wine country𠅊nd even easier to land a quick buzz by drinking everything offered to you. But things can get sloppy fast. And, hey, we’ve all been there.

I remember my first wine tasting in Napa Valley. My then-fiance and soon-to-be mother-in-law dropped by Heitz Cellars in St. Helena, California, which in the early aughts offered free tastings. I recall being timid and unsure of the protocol, so I drank everything: two-ounce pours of maybe ten different wines in about 20 minutes’ time. By the end, my knees were buckling, I was quoting Frank Sinatra (“Nobody was driving, officer, we were all in the back seat!”) and trying to convince the host I was looking to buy Heitz—much to the dismay of my future mother-in-law and wife.

Take it from me, here’s a bit of gathered advice and some common faux pas to avoid:


How to Not Embarrass Yourself at a Winery

There is an unspoken code of conduct that comes into play when visiting a winery. After all, some wineries see hundreds of visitors a day, while others𠅎xclusive appointment-only wineries—may entertain as few as 10 guests daily. But no matter the size of the crowd, passing out on the welcome couch and drooling all over some custom-designed pillows because you drank too much isn’t going to fly. Making matters worse, all anyone can smell is the powerful cologne you doused yourself with, which is now saturating the pillow, too.

So, it’s time for the talk. Not that one—I mean, how not to embarrass yourself at a winery.

It’s easy to get caught up in the romance of visiting wine country𠅊nd even easier to land a quick buzz by drinking everything offered to you. But things can get sloppy fast. And, hey, we’ve all been there.

I remember my first wine tasting in Napa Valley. My then-fiance and soon-to-be mother-in-law dropped by Heitz Cellars in St. Helena, California, which in the early aughts offered free tastings. I recall being timid and unsure of the protocol, so I drank everything: two-ounce pours of maybe ten different wines in about 20 minutes’ time. By the end, my knees were buckling, I was quoting Frank Sinatra (“Nobody was driving, officer, we were all in the back seat!”) and trying to convince the host I was looking to buy Heitz—much to the dismay of my future mother-in-law and wife.

Take it from me, here’s a bit of gathered advice and some common faux pas to avoid:


How to Not Embarrass Yourself at a Winery

There is an unspoken code of conduct that comes into play when visiting a winery. After all, some wineries see hundreds of visitors a day, while others𠅎xclusive appointment-only wineries—may entertain as few as 10 guests daily. But no matter the size of the crowd, passing out on the welcome couch and drooling all over some custom-designed pillows because you drank too much isn’t going to fly. Making matters worse, all anyone can smell is the powerful cologne you doused yourself with, which is now saturating the pillow, too.

So, it’s time for the talk. Not that one—I mean, how not to embarrass yourself at a winery.

It’s easy to get caught up in the romance of visiting wine country𠅊nd even easier to land a quick buzz by drinking everything offered to you. But things can get sloppy fast. And, hey, we’ve all been there.

I remember my first wine tasting in Napa Valley. My then-fiance and soon-to-be mother-in-law dropped by Heitz Cellars in St. Helena, California, which in the early aughts offered free tastings. I recall being timid and unsure of the protocol, so I drank everything: two-ounce pours of maybe ten different wines in about 20 minutes’ time. By the end, my knees were buckling, I was quoting Frank Sinatra (“Nobody was driving, officer, we were all in the back seat!”) and trying to convince the host I was looking to buy Heitz—much to the dismay of my future mother-in-law and wife.

Take it from me, here’s a bit of gathered advice and some common faux pas to avoid:


How to Not Embarrass Yourself at a Winery

There is an unspoken code of conduct that comes into play when visiting a winery. After all, some wineries see hundreds of visitors a day, while others𠅎xclusive appointment-only wineries—may entertain as few as 10 guests daily. But no matter the size of the crowd, passing out on the welcome couch and drooling all over some custom-designed pillows because you drank too much isn’t going to fly. Making matters worse, all anyone can smell is the powerful cologne you doused yourself with, which is now saturating the pillow, too.

So, it’s time for the talk. Not that one—I mean, how not to embarrass yourself at a winery.

It’s easy to get caught up in the romance of visiting wine country𠅊nd even easier to land a quick buzz by drinking everything offered to you. But things can get sloppy fast. And, hey, we’ve all been there.

I remember my first wine tasting in Napa Valley. My then-fiance and soon-to-be mother-in-law dropped by Heitz Cellars in St. Helena, California, which in the early aughts offered free tastings. I recall being timid and unsure of the protocol, so I drank everything: two-ounce pours of maybe ten different wines in about 20 minutes’ time. By the end, my knees were buckling, I was quoting Frank Sinatra (“Nobody was driving, officer, we were all in the back seat!”) and trying to convince the host I was looking to buy Heitz—much to the dismay of my future mother-in-law and wife.

Take it from me, here’s a bit of gathered advice and some common faux pas to avoid:


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